Cheri Spaulding - Rock Nest Training and Pet Care in Creswell, Eugene, and Springfield

Crate Training

September is off to a fiery start in Oregon.  Many residents have been on evacuation alert or evacuated. You want to make sure your emergency plan is in place and every member of your family is calm and safe.  Your pets don’t understand why they have to suddenly travel and be kept in crowded conditions of a hotel or shelter. This is one reason why having a crate trained pet is so important.

The following crate training methods can work for your cat, bunny, and even your chickens, but I am referring to “dog” in my directions:

To start training, move the crate into an area near you such as a living area or home office.  In the beginning, leave the door open during training, tempt your dog to freely go into the crate using toys, chewies or food treats as rewards.  The key is whatever you use must be rewarding to your dog.  Pretty soon your dog will look in the crate for those rewards.  When you see that happening, reward your dog after he has entered the crate.  Then start closing the door for a couple seconds and treat your dog through the door.  The trick is to not go too fast with training or your dog will think the crate is a punishment. You want them to be comfortable with the process every step. Keep your training sessions short, 5 minutes at most.

Crate Training may take some time though, especially for a pet that has unpleasant associations with the crate. My dog, Geo, was very frightened of the crate.  With a little training and positive associations with the crate, he now naps in his crate.   It’s lovely to have a dog who will happily chew on a stuffed Kong while relaxed in his crate.  As I’m typing Geo is sleeping in his crate. I can be assured that if Geo needs to be crated at the Veterinarian’s or in an emergency situation, he will have crate experience.

Having a crate trained pet is a load off your mind when you need to get together essentials for your evacuation kit.    A crated pet is a joy to travel with, is calmer at the Veterinary Hospital, and they are ready for anything. I know many dogs that use their crate as a “bomb shelter” during fireworks or thunder.

To help you with the evacuation list, the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association) has a supply list on their website, https://www.avma.org/public/EmergencyCare/Pages/Pets-and-Disasters.aspx?utm_source=smartbrief&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=smartbrief-article

You can find Rock Nest Training & Pet Care LLC at facebook.com/rocknestpetcare/

 

 

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